HOW TROUBLED TEENS STRUGGLING WITH TEEN DEPRESSION CAN ASK FOR HELP Teen depression is very hard to deal with, and one of the hardest steps is the first step, which is asking for help. As Metro explains, “When I asked my friends if they’re comfortable asking for help with their mental health, the general consensus was a big old nope.” One psychologist told the Metro explained that many struggling with depression feel like they don’t deserve to get help. “It’s an insidious condition that makes it hard to see clearly what is going on.” But as this article explains, “This is exactly why we need to be honest about our symptoms in order to treat them effectively.” As Metro suggests, when troubled teens are struggling, or if you’re struggling at any age, instead of saying you’re fine, you can tell someone you trust, “I feel so lost, trapped and like everything is out of my control.” In other words, say what’s on your mind. As Metro continues, “There’s nothing more freeing than throwing your hands up and admitting that actually, you feel unwell and could use some friendly advice.” You can also say, “I’m not coping,” which the author of this story explains, “I find this particularly good when you need to express to your partner or your employers that you’ve taken on too much. You may feel like it’s obvious to the world that you’re in mental distress but often everyone else is too busy getting on with their own work to notice, so use this as a conversation starter to manage your workload better.” Other good phrases that can help include, “I would really benefit from some company,” and “Today is not a good day for me.” As Metro explains, “Just opening up the conversation will lead to better understanding. Just take your time and ask to sit with someone quietly while you begin to explain how you really feel. You matter and people care.”

Teen depression is very hard to deal with, and one of the hardest steps is the first step, which is asking for help. As Metro explains, “When I asked my friends if they’re comfortable asking for help with their mental health, the general consensus was a big old nope.”

One psychologist told the Metro explained that many struggling with depression feel like they don’t deserve to get help. “It’s an insidious condition that makes it hard to see clearly what is going on.” But as this article explains, “This is exactly why we need to be honest about our symptoms in order to treat them effectively.”

As Metro suggests, when troubled teens are struggling, or if you’re struggling at any age, instead of saying you’re fine, you can tell someone you trust, “I feel so lost, trapped and like everything is out of my control.” In other words, say what’s on your mind. As Metro continues, “There’s nothing more freeing than throwing your hands up and admitting that actually, you feel unwell and could use some friendly advice.”

You can also say, “I’m not coping,” which the author of this story explains, “I find this particularly good when you need to express to your partner or your employers that you’ve taken on too much. You may feel like it’s obvious to the world that you’re in mental distress but often everyone else is too busy getting on with their own work to notice, so use this as a conversation starter to manage your workload better.” 

Other good phrases that can help include, “I would really benefit from some company,” and “Today is not a good day for me.” As Metro explains, “Just opening up the conversation will lead to better understanding. Just take your time and ask to sit with someone quietly while you begin to explain how you really feel. You matter and people care.”